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DIY keyboard wrist rest & DIY mouse pad wrist rest

DIY keyboard wrist rest & DIY mouse pad wrist rest

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See how to sew a bean bag wrist rest for keyboards!

DIY keyboard wrist rest & DIY mouse pad wrist rest

It can be tough to sew gifts for people you don’t know well, but this is a super simple idea that anyone in the digital age can use! A customized wrist wrest for their keyboard and/or mouse, easy to personalize and cheap to make. I picked a bright kitty print for myself and a geek-chic computer themed fabric as a gift (pitured below) but you could easily change the vibe with a sports team logo print, nice soft flannel, or upcycled fabric from a favorite shirt or blanket.

computer themed fabric

Here is the original version I stitched up!

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how to sew computer wrist rests

DIY keyboard wrist rest & DIY mouse pad wrist rest

Supplies

  • Rotary cutter & quilt ruler
  • 1/4 yard of woven cotton
  • 1/2 yard of fusible interfacing
  • Mini glass pellets as filler
  • Iron & ironing board
  • Scissors
  • Hand sewing needle

Steps

Step 1 – I cut 4 rectangles for each rest, 2 of the fabric and 2 of fusible interfacing that was lightweight.  My small wrist rest was cut at 4″ X 8″ and my long rest was cut at 5″ X 17″.

beginner gift sewing tutorial

Step 2- Iron the interfacing on to the fabric! And laugh at my belly in this picture (circa 2012, old post updated!).

Step 3- Turn the fabric pieces inside out so the fabrics are facing one another (right sides together) and serge or sew along 3 edges in their entirety. Then, on the 4th edge be sure to leave a spot unsewn so you can turn it inside out. It’s up to you how long – I usually do an inch or two which makes it a little tougher to fill but easier to sew closed. You can see where it dips out a little in the picture, which is the opening. Make sure to go back & forth for a few stitches at the beginning and end of the seam.

ironing a seam allowance

Step 4- I like to iron the seam allowance on both sides before turning right side out, it makes it easier to stitch close!

trimming corners

Step 5- Clip the corners (pictured above) and flip them right side out, pulling gently through the gap you left in the seam! I use a little crochet hook to push the corners out nice and sharp,although I think there is a special tool if you prefer. If you’re feeling extra fancy, iron it out so it is nice and flat.

Step 6- Fill them up! You could use old fabric scraps, or a mixture of poly-fill; you want some weight in them. I used the mini glass beads for comfort and convenience!

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now at home mom

Tuesday 30th of October 2012

This is a very good idea! :-)

swoodsonsays

Wednesday 31st of October 2012

Thanks! It was super simple!

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