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Hand Stamped Harem Pants

Week 3 of Project Run & Play! You can see my first week’s look and second week’s look, or read more about Project Run & Play. This will sadly be my last week since we’ll be visiting family, missing out on the Signature Style challenge! I’ll be looking forward to seeing what everyone else sews though.

This week, the theme was to create your own fabric. I had a hard time choosing a method, but ended up tie dying a top and hand stamping pants; details on how to make your own stamp and the shibori tie dye method I used are below!

I used the Best Harem Pants from Too Sweets; all of the fabric is thrifted.

This is a short sleeved Hangout Hoodie * with a modified neckline, the (originally yellow) jersey fabric was a flat apparel fabric fold from Hancock Fabrics*.

The blue was a lightweight sweatshirt fleece without a ton of stretch, so it made the pants a bit more jodphur-y instead of true harems. We played “Hammertime” while taking these pictures – you can see my husband’s hand above, he chases our son around the house so I can try and get a few shots since it’s still too cold to wear short sleeves outside.

I know this shape isn’t for some people, but I just can’t help but smile at his poufy pants! We cloth diaper, so it is nice how much range of movement he has in these.

The tie dye method I used was Shibori inspired, which is a Japanese resist dying technique. You can read more about Shibori here, there are so many beautiful variations! I found a kit on clearance on Target, you can also buy it on amazon*.

I picked rocks from our yard and secured rubber bands around them, trying to keep things somewhat symmetrical.

I was drawn to this method because my son absolutely adores rocks. When he was much younger, he would crawl over and bang them together gleefully. Now, he loves to stomp all over them, rearrange them, and hand them to us as gifts (over, and over, and over again). So, tie dying his shirt with rocks from our yard added some sentiment to the process and finished product!

On to the pant stamping!

I wanted the pattern to be pretty subtle, as not to compete with the bright orange pattern. All of the stamps I had were too large or too cartoon-y so I decided to carve my own.

I visited our local art store to pick up a plastic eraser ($1) – they are soft enough to carve easily but firm enough to stamp. This was the only shape they had, but you could easily cut it in half for two custom stamps. VersaCraft ink is the only one I could find that specifically said it was compatible with fabric, and I bought it off Amazon*.

I simply sketched the design with a pencil and used a  handy carving tool that came with a Speedball Block Printing Kit* that I bought a few years ago. You can find these in the art sections of any craft store! It has a few different size tips that store inside the handle.

 After you carve, ink, and stamp, the last step is to heat set the fabric with an iron and pressing cloth. You’re supposed to wait a week to wash it, but I’ve forgotten without any ill results thus far!

 Making your own fabric really appeals to me because it can turn plain fabrics and upcycled shirts into something special.  Do you have a favorite textile method?

*affiliate link

 

This Post Has 15 Comments
  1. I love the shape of those pants too! They make me giggle! Great job on the fabric design challenge…this one actually ended up being very hard for us due to the weather!!

  2. Those are very cute pants, and I love that style on little kids. They look so comfy and easy to move around in. Great job on the different fabric manipulations. I used decolourant this time, but mostly I like to paint fabric.

  3. This is great! I actually first carved a stamp from a pencil eraser, which worked well, but it was smaller than I wanted. I’m not sure why the idea of using a larger eraser never crossed my mind!
    Also I’ll have to look for that ink. I didn’t have good luck trying to use the regular ink pad I have, so maybe the fabric kind will work better!

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